Are you a health coach who constantly wonders if you know enough about health to work with clients?

Do you always feel like you need to take one more class about leaky gut, one more class about autoimmune disorders, and one more class about depression before you actually start getting out there and helping other people?

Although you’re not alone, here’s what I want you to know. If you continue to let your fear of not knowing enough deter you from coaching, you’re never going to build the successful business you dream of.

When I first started my health coaching practice, I also faced the same fears. I always felt like I didn’t know enough.

In my effort to become the best coach I could be for my clients, I devoted so much of my time to learning and becoming a health expert.

I felt that if I didn’t stay ahead of health information, a client would know more than me or ask me something that I knew nothing about and call me a fraud. I thought, “What if someone comes to me with an autoimmune condition that I haven’t heard of? What if someone asks me if I can help them with their diabetes or their cancer or their depression and I can’t?”

I was in a constant state of worry and this really weighed me down. Can you relate?

The worst part of it all was that my schedule was so full from learning and worrying about not knowing enough, I had no time to build my business!

I knew something had to change and it was at this point in my career that I realized something that completely changed my practice.

I realized that regardless of how much time I devoted to learning, I’d NEVER know it all! Health education is constantly evolving and new research is published every week!

So there is absolutely no WAY I’d be able to keep up with it all. No one can! It’s just not possible.

When I realized this, I stopped devoting so much time to learning and instead, devoted all that time to coaching and building my business.

When working with a new client who had a health condition I didn’t know much about, I committed to learning as I coached (not before I felt comfortable coaching).

For example, if I started working with a client who suffered from Type 2 Diabetes, here is what I’d say to her:

“I’m incredibly passionate about helping you on this journey so that you can navigate this condition. Type 2 Diabetes is a health topic that I’ve always wanted to learn more about. To get started, I’m going to do some research and gather some information for you. Then, I’m going to send some ideas and recommendations for you to look into. Then, I want us to sit down and have a conversation about the best next steps.”

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By handling the situation this way, you’re being completely transparent. You’re letting the client know that although you aren’t an expert on her specific health condition, you’re confident you can help her by simplifying all of the overwhelming information and guiding her in the right direction.

Then, you learn as you go!

You’re also able to help your clients understand physician recommendations.

For example, let’s say the doctor tells your client that she needs to go on a low-carb diet. She tells you that she’s overwhelmed because she has no idea where to start. This is a big lifestyle change for most people!

You tell the client that you’d be happy to pull together some valuable resources and information about low-carb diets that she can review. You tell her that once she has a chance to review and figure out a game plan that is comfortable for her, you’ll meet with her again to make it easy for her to put the changes into motion.

Isn’t this beautiful?

By simply shifting your process, you’re able to start coaching right away! And the best part is that this strategy works with any client, regardless of their condition or health goal!

This is how I built a successful practice with a wait list and how you can to. Start with the basics and learn as you go! You’ll be amazed by how well this works for you.

Now get out there and start coaching!

 

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